Langdon

Langdon is rural New Hampshire at its best! There is a quiet beauty that draws you in and takes you to a simpler time. Both of the covered bridges in Langdon are closed to vehicular traffic and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The McDermott Bridge spans the Cold River.

McDermott Covered Bridge Built in 1864

McDermott Covered Bridge
Built in 1864

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The second covered bridge is the Prentiss Bridge, spanning Great Brook. The Prentiss Bridge is the smallest covered bridge in New Hampshire…

Prentiss Bridge Built in 1874

Prentiss Bridge
Built in 1874

When I wasn’t checking out the bridges, I was driving by breathtaking scenery…

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And checking out some of the wonderful barns, old and new…

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Langdon’s town hall continues the feel of historic rural New Hampshire…

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I hope you enjoyed my tour of Langdon!

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12 Comments on “Langdon”

  1. lulu July 21, 2014 at 11:11 am #

    Enjoyed the visit. I love New Hampshire’s covered bridges and pastoral scenery.

    • Touring NH July 21, 2014 at 11:25 am #

      Thank you. There is something so peaceful and calming about the scenery.

  2. marthaschaefer July 21, 2014 at 11:48 am #

    Really lovely. How many covered bridges and barns have you photographed? Every one is a beautiful shot all by itself. The town hall is so New England but seems larger than most.

    • Touring NH July 21, 2014 at 12:14 pm #

      I started photographing covered bridges by county several years ago and have done almost all the bridges in NH. Barns? I counted even begin to count. The town hall did seem a bit large, at first, I thought perhaps it was a church that had been converted. But on second look, I don’t think so.

  3. New Hampshire Garden Solutions July 21, 2014 at 11:25 pm #

    Langdon is another town I’ve driven through many times but I never even knew that they had a town hall.
    They’ve got some beautiful views there!

    • Touring NH July 22, 2014 at 9:22 am #

      I think it is interesting, I’ve become more in tune with the small things in the woods since I started reading your blog and you’ve begun to notice things like town halls. Sounds like we are both doing something right!

  4. Ellen Kolb July 24, 2014 at 1:03 am #

    What a pleasure to see your photos today. You gave me a little mental vacation to Langdon – a place I hope to see for myself soon!

    • Touring NH July 24, 2014 at 8:31 am #

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      Thank you Ellen. I’m sure you will enjoy visiting Langdon and the surrounding towns.

  5. mariekeates July 24, 2014 at 6:54 am #

    The covered. Ridges intrigue me because we don’t have anything like them here. The barns and buildings are lovely too as is the scenery.

    • Touring NH July 24, 2014 at 8:33 am #

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      I love covered bridges. The workmanship is amazing.

  6. gallivance.net July 26, 2014 at 7:14 pm #

    Another beautiful town Laura. Your shots of the covered bridges always make me smile because I grew up with them in Indiana. I was told that the sides were covered so that the horses wouldn’t freak out. Is that what you’ve heard” ~Terri

    • Touring NH July 26, 2014 at 11:33 pm #

      Actually, the reason they are covered is it is easier to clear the snow. The paths/lanes can be cleared, but the bridges don’t need to be cleared because they are covered. This does pose other problems. Carriages would have sleigh runners on them, but the bridges would be dry. They used to shovel a bit on snow onto the bridge so they could cross without tearing up the runners too badly. Can’t solve every problem with a roof, lol.

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